How stainless steel plate heat exchanger fouling is formed

  Fouling is the most common problem in the operation of stainless steel plate heat exchangers. Fouling refers to that during the long-term flow of How stainless steel plate heat exchanger fouling is formedthe working medium through the stainless steel plate heat exchanger, impurities and calcium and magnesium ions solidified on the surface of the stainless steel plate heat exchanger are adhered and deposited. As a result, a layer of dirt is formed on the surface of the stainless steel plate heat exchanger, preventing energy from being transmitted through the heat exchange wall surface.Dirt can reduce heat exchange efficiency, hinder the flow of media, and increase the pressure drop of stainless steel plate heat exchangers. Considering various aspects of operation, the fouling factors on the heat exchange surface must be properly considered during the design phase. It minimizes the effects of dirt and thus extends the life of the stainless steel plate heat exchanger as much as possible.

  When designing a stainless steel plate heat exchanger that may produce dirt for a period of time, the designer uses the dirt factor to indicate the effect of dirt on the overall use of the stainless steel plate heat exchanger. So as to improve the life, running time and efficiency of stainless steel plate heat exchanger.This usually increases the area of the stainless steel plate heat exchanger. The working medium in many applications is not particularly clean because it contains some impurities, and it must be continuously operated for a long time.Stainless steel plate heat exchangers are used continuously for a long period without cleaning. We only compensate for the effect of fouling by increasing the design fouling coefficient of the stainless steel plate heat exchanger, so that the stainless steel plate heat exchanger can still work effectively to the expected time under the state of fouling.